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WHEN CRESA MET MARK

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WHEN CRESA MET MARK
Good business is the result of hard work and planning—unless, of course, it just falls in your lap. Cresa has been busy hiring and expanding its offices all over the country and had already made changes in its NYC office. Then, Mark Jaccom started looking around for something else to do. And now, Cresa happily has the NY heavyweight at its helm.
Mark Jaccom
The former Colliers tristate CEO and then co-chair has been NYC president of Cresa since early June. At Colliers, he had become more of a company salesperson as the firm began centralizing support and operations for the individual Colliers offices First Service had been buying. He found himself missing the pure tenant rep work on which he'd been raised at Studley and also saw a hole for tenant rep firms with recent consolidation like JLL's acquisition of Staubach.

Marcus Rayner
Here's Cresa NY resident rainmaker Marcus Rayner, who is also CoreNet NY chair and will help Mark run the NY office. Mark tells us Cresa will move to a new location between Thanksgiving and Christmas to accommodate its plan is to grow to 25 brokers and 15 support staffers by next year. The first addition: former NY Giant Howard Cross. (They'll need some extra space to accommodate his giant Super Bowl ring.) Mark, who's flyfishing in Montana as you read this, also intends to follow in Julien Studley's footsteps and be the kind of boss who takes the staff on multi-day trips where shop talk is forbidden. He says his two daughters (a Colorado social worker, 25, and a Vermont interior designer, 28) have made him a softer person. His other hobby: cooking for 15 every Sunday.
Bob Stella
We also snapped Cresa NY's Bob Stella, who tells us one area where he expected more biz to materialize is the splintering of financial services firms. He anticipated JPMorgan, Goldman, and Citi arms to break off but says Dodd-Frank has scuttled the formation of new companies and thus those divisions are staying close to home. And with less M&A and IPO biz, there's less litigation work for lawyers and thus fewer real estate requirements for them and their third-party servicers. Still law firms are a sweet spot for tenant rep firms (lawyers like the lack of potential conflict of interest).