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THE NEW MAN IN BLACK

Boston

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THE NEW MAN IN BLACK
Robert Brown, Perkins + Will
So Robert Brown, the new managing director of Perkins + Will'sBoston office, did mix a bit of white and blue into the architects? standard all-black attire. Still, he's all architect. After 30 years at CBT Architects (eventually becoming principal) Robert jumped into the top slot at P+W in early August. The growing Boston office, now 65 people, will soon hit 70 (out of 1,600 worldwide). As the current economic turmoil transforms how businesses operate, Robert says a national firm like P+W gives him extra resourcesand insight to help his clients. For instance, he's using its national research to see more clearly where clients? businesses are going or need to go. In the post-Great Recession world, he saysarchitecture is a transformational tool to help clients do things differently.
Perkins + Will, Jeannine Campbell (center)
We snapped David Dymecki, leader of the athletic practice with Natasha Tashian and Jeannine Campbell who tells us she's designing corporate interiors for businesses that want to be cool in less space. For instance, the office of Phillips Electronics in Framingham is cranking 24/7. Jeannine and her team designed the 9,000 SF office for 150 people so that each person has 100% mobility and assumes that the entire facility is their space. They may want use a ?focus area? to work alone or a meeting space to collaborate. Then again, they may rearrange the moveable furniture that serves as space dividers to create a place for their need-of-the-moment. Bottom line, there's 63 SF/person (vs 135 SF/person).
THE NEW MAN IN BLACK
Jessica Stebbins, here with Dan Stubbs, expects that the new 360k SF Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital that she and her team designed will be fully enclosed next month. Construction started in January '10 and will be completed December ?12. "Accessible" is the theme for the project, which sits at the water?s edge in the Charlestown Naval Shipyard. Roof decks and outdoor spaces are accessible to people with limited mobility. In the gardens, some paths have stations where a nature lover can do upper body exercise and other paths have stairs to help patients build strength.