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August 30, 2021

The ‘Catch-22’ That Holds HBCUs Back From Being A CRE Feeder System

The commercial real estate industry is aware of its lack of racial diversity, and many of its biggest companies say they are working to grow the pipeline of people of color into the business. But one oft-cited source of potential employees doesn't have the infrastructure to support that pipeline at present — not even close.

A review of current course catalogs from each of the accredited Historically Black Colleges and Universities found that none have a real estate major or concentration for bachelor’s or graduate degrees. Only 26 offer real estate-specific classes for credit, at least four offer non-credit continuing education classes, and two historically Black community colleges offer vocational programs in real estate.

The ‘Catch-22’ That Holds HBCUs Back From Being A CRE Feeder System

The Hundred-Seven, an HBCU-focused nonprofit, lists three schools as offering real estate programs on its website: Lawson State Community College, which offers a vocational certificate, and Allen University and St. Augustine’s University. Allen doesn't list any real estate programs or courses on its catalog; representatives for the school…

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Foulger-Pratt Partnering With Southwest D.C. Church On 197-Unit Apartment Project

Foulger-Pratt Partnering With Southwest D.C. Church On 197-Unit Apartment Project

Another D.C.-area church has partnered with a developer to build housing on its land, with the latest such project coming in Southwest D.C. Foulger-Pratt has leased land from the Bethel Pentecostal Tabernacle Assembly of God church at 60 Eye St. SW to build 197 apartments with a 17K SF sanctuary for the church on…

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From Work From Home To Touchless Tech: Designing For Today’s Multifamily Tenants

PRESENTED BY:   WDG Architecture Blog
 
From Work From Home To Touchless Tech: Designing For Today’s Multifamily Tenants  

This past year, people across the globe started to look at their homes in a new way. Previously, a busy professional’s apartment may have just been the place they rest their head at the end of the day. Now, for many, it is the center of their lives — a…

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Cities Need Office Workers. Do Office Workers Still Need Cities?

Bisnow's new podcast series, Office Politics: The Battle For The Future Of Work, is an in-depth examination into the raging debate surrounding when and where we work, and how that will affect not just how we use offices, but the operation of society itself. Featuring academics, authors, business leaders and workers, weekly episodes will look at how the potential shift to more remote work will affect productivity and the economy, social equality and workplace diversity, human psychology, the fight against climate change and the future of cities. You can subscribe on iTunesSpotify and Amazon Music.

As the end of summer brings the potential for a more significant return to the office by workers, big cities like New York and London are facing one of the greatest ever challenges to their economic model — hybrid work.

The idea that workers might only come to the office two or three days a week presents a major problem for the businesses in city centers that rely on them, business owners told Bisnow in the fifth and concluding episode of Office Politics: The Battle For The Future Of Work, a podcast series presented by Industrious

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LA Is Trying To Plan For A Big Downtown Housing Boom. Can It Meet The Need?

 

LOS ANGELES - Downtown Los Angeles’ reputation and landscape have changed dramatically over the past two decades. In 2001, Downtown was barely beginning to show signs of transforming from a place for workers to commute to and from into a place where those same workers elected to live. The residential population of Downtown LA has grown from just under 28,000 in 2000 to an estimated 80,000 in 2019.

The Department of City Planning’s Downtown LA Community Plan update offers guidelines for what can be built and where in Downtown LA over the next two decades. It is also linked to new zoning rules for the area. The plan projects that Downtown will add 125,000 residents and 55,000 jobs by 2040. That boom in residents would represent 20% of the city’s housing growth happening in a neighborhood that takes up 1% of the city’s land. The plan aims to accommodate what those residents will need, including housing. 

Architects and land use professionals who spoke to Bisnow said that Downtown has, over much of the past couple of decades, been one of the LA neighborhoods least likely to see pushback against new development. Still, some were unsure that the plan’s impacts would necessarily achieve its goals. 

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