If you don't see images, click here to view
Story Ideas  Events 

To ensure delivery, please add newsletter@bisnow.com to your address book, learn how
Tech Bisnow
Real EstateLegalAssociationMedicalThe SceneWomen
   
January 8, 2009
 
 
 
Jones Lang LaSalle
 
The Bisnow
2009

FEDERAL IT
POWER 50

(31-40)


A big welcome to great new sponsor Apatoff | Peters, LLC, which is rapidly becoming a go-to law firm for tech firms and entrepreneurs.  Click here or see ad in text for more details.


 

Do you feel the heat? Our countdown marches on.

 

31.  A trio from SAIC:  Larry Prior, COO; Arnold Punaro, EVP/GM, Washington operations; Deb Alderson, Group President, Defense Solutions Group.  Larry, who previously ran the intel business line and started his career as a Hill staffer, was selected in '07 to help run the whole shebang, but still spends nearly half time here even though he has an excuse to be at HQ in sunny La Jolla. Arnold, a retired Marine Corps reserve general who saw service in Vietnam and Desert Storm and 25 years as defense adviser to Sen. Sam Nunn, is known affectionately as "Mayor of SAIC," heading gov affairs, communications, and Washington ops. Fast-rising star Deb has operating responsibilities and a high profile, running one of four of SAIC's major business lines, responsible for 10,000 employees, and having joined in '05 after heading Anteon's Systems Engineering Group.

 
Apatoff Peters
 

32. Harry Raduege, Chairman, Deloitte Center for Network Innovation. A 35-year Air Force vet who as director of DISA and improved defense and White House communications after 9/11, the LTG "groomed Croom" (see next entry), worked closely with Tom Ridge, and above all influenced IT across DoD, making it a model for the entire government. He also did a stint as an advisor to IBM, and directed the Network Centric Operations Industry Consortium. Now he helps clients use the interoperable information systems he participated in designing.

 

33. Charlie Croom, Director of Lockheed Martin's Center for Cyber Security Innovation. "The smartest guy we have in blue," his fans said, referring to his uniform, when he served in government until July as head of DISA and the Joint Task Force's Global Network Operations. Late last year Charlie made his splash into the contractor side by becoming Lockheed's new cyber security czar. A great listener and gentleman, Charlie is widely regarded as the model of a commanding officer: optimizing government contractor resources to betterment of his mission. 

 

34. Vance Hitch, CIO, Department of Justice; and Casey Coleman, CIO, GSA. The former Accenture partner, quiet but highly-respected by his peers, is active in the CIO Council and long involved in major innovations like the Integrated Wireless Network Initiative (with then fellow-CIOs Hobbs and Cooper) to bring technology for DoJ into the 21st century. GSA's Casey has pioneered using open source for transactional, mission-critical systems like the JBoss application server for acquisition systems and Linux for data centers, plus set a high environmental and family-friendly standard, pushing for half of GSA's 12,000 employees to telework at least one day a week.

 

35. Lisa Wolfe, program director, Federal News Radio. What was once a poor WTOP cousin has now taken over its powerful 1500 AM place on the dial, probably still a pre-set in many of the region's cars (as the parent moved to FM), and Lisa has built a remarkable team: former GCN editor Tom Temin, former FCW editor Chris Dorobek, and former FCW news editor Jason Miller. Speaking of Chris: We've become regular readers of his blog: www.DorobekInsider.com.

 

36. Ralph Shrader, CEO, and Jack Mayer, Vice President, Booz Allen. Jack's involved advising (as Booz is known for) at the "strategic inside level" on organization transformation and change management in the public sector, focusing on DHS, GSA, and the Army, and building on a background at CNA and on Capitol Hill. Longtime CEO Ralph helped engineer the $2.5 billion acquisition of the government services part of the 20,000 employee, $4 billion consulting giant by Carlyle, largest buyout ever of a government contractor, in the process impressing the private equity firm that Booz should pretty much continue to be run as before.

 

37. Linda Mills, President, Northrop Grumman Information Technology. Linda took over the top job at NGIT earlier this year after Jim O'Neill retired; she'd held a number of top posts there since coming over with Northrop's TRW acquisition in 2002. Now at the head of a $4.5 billion division, Linda is successfully leading the IT services component of the largest, fastest-growing division of the company, partly because of her vision to go after non-defense contracts in health IT and homeland security.

 

38. Sudhakar Shenoy, CEO, Information Management Consultants. Force of personality—warm, gregarious, and mischievous—has rarely been as effective a business tool as it is with beloved Sudhakar, whose passions for politics, golf, community and practical joking compete with, but also assist, his entrepreneurship. Let's face it: You don't have a real tech party without Sudhakar on hand.

 

39. The May-Be-Back Gang: former CIOs Gloria Parker, Jim Flyzik, Steve Cooper, Alan Balutis, Bruce McConnell, and Dan Chenok. We assume that Gloria, the former HUD CIO, is more in the Will Be Back, given that she's on the parachute team for the Obama transition. The others seem to have their Democratic credentials in order, a strong career record, and rumored willingness, or interest, in returning. And could there be others out there getting nostalgic for 18 hour days, even of the R persuasion (this is supposed to be a bipartisan administration)? So who knows, could we see a return someday of Mark Forman, John Gilligan, Dan Matthews, Lee Holcolm, Marv Langston, Zal Azmi, Ed Meagher, Barry West, or (just recently departed) Dan Mintz?

 

40. The May-Be-Back Gang, Part 2: John Grimes, CIO, DoD; Paul Brubaker, Administrator of the DoT's Research and Innovative Technology Administration. In another corner are some still in office who might leave, and in four or eight years be ready to come back. We hear John is sticking around DoD at least a few months (it's nice when the new prez keeps your boss). He sits on more than half the federal IT budget; if the day ever comes that stovepipes in government are finally expunged (don't count on it), they'll build John a statue. Paul's not quite on the mountaintop yet, and could someday appear in a larger position, even though today he already oversees a billion dollars DoT spends on tech R&D.

 
 
 
JLL
 
Cardinal Bank
 
Pillsbury
 
Kipps DeSanto
 
Harvest Bank
 
Subscribe
 
 
CONTACT EDITORIAL
CONTACT ADVERTISING
CONTACT GENERAL INFO

This newsletter is a journalistic news source which accepts no payment for featured interviews. It is supported by conventional advertisers clearly identified in the right hand column. You have been selected to receive it either through prior contact or professional association. If you have received it in error, please accept our apologies and unsubscribe below. ? 2008, Bisnow on Business, Inc., 1323 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20036. All rights reserved.

Zegna Adrian Jules Dormeuil email Tech Bisnow Sent Using iContact